2007


 

Jonathan Steele

Defeat: Why Bush and Blair Lost their War in Iraq

March 25, 2007

 

7:30 p.m.
Irma B. Moore Hall Auditorium 

Program                    

Ann Durr Lyon, daughter of Clifford and Virginia Durr, receives a framed promotional poster of the 2007 Clifford Judkins and Virginia Foster Durr Lecture from Judd Katz, Auburn Montgomery associate vice chancellor for academic and student affairs. The annual Durr Lecture Series on civil liberties was established in memory of Clifford and Virginia. Clifford was a Montgomerian who defended the rights of free speech and equal protection under the law and stood by his principles through adversity during the Civil Rights era. Virginia was also a champion for civil rights, a member of the NAACP and a longtime friend of Rosa Parks. The annual Durr Lecture Series is held on AUM’s campus.

Welcome

Chancellor John G. Veres III

Greetings from the Durr Family Ann Durr Lyon

Introduction of Speaker

Dr. Judd Katz
Lecturer Johnathan Steele
Questions and Answers  
Closing Remarks

Chancellor John G. Veres III

Johnathan Steele

Jonathan Steele, senior foreign correspondent and in-house columnist on international affairs for The Guardian of London, delivers the 2007 Clifford Judkins and Virginia Foster Durr Lecture held at Auburn Montgomery. Steele discussed the problems that the United States and Britain have faced in the war in Iraq in his lecture titled “Defeat: Why Bush and Blair Lost Their War in Iraq.” Steele has had eight assignments in Iraq since the U.S. invasion in March 2003 and was there most recently in November 2006. A native of Great Britain, Steele graduated from Cambridge University in the classics and attended Yale University as a Harkness Fellow to earn a master’s degree in economics. While at Yale, he volunteered for the Mississippi Summer Project in 1964 that helped black Americans register to vote and took part in the march from Selma to Montgomery that was turned back at the Edmund Pettus Bridge on March 9, 1965. 

Johnnie Carr listens intently to Jonathan Steele’s lecture titled “Defeat: Why Bush and Blair Lost Their War in Iraq,” during the 2007 Clifford Judkins and Virginia Foster Durr Lecture. Carr worked with the NAACP and later with the Montgomery Improvement Association, the organization that was responsible for heading the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott that lasted for 381 days. The annual lecture on civil liberties was established in memory of Clifford and Virginia Durr. Carr was a friend of Clifford and Virginia Durr.

Jonathan Steele, right, accepts a framed promotional poster of the 2007 Clifford Judkins and Virginia Foster Durr Lecture from Judd Katz, Auburn Montgomery associate vice chancellor for academic and student affairs. Steele joined The Guardian in 1965 as a reporter. His first foreign assignment was as East European correspondent soon after the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968. As chief foreign correspondent in the 1980s, Steele traveled widely, covering wars in southern Africa and Central America. A regular visitor to Afghanistan, Steele was the only Western newspaper correspondent in Kabul when Soviet forces withdrew. He also covered the Taliban takeover in 1996 and their collapse in 2001.